Choice to Forgive

Al-Araf (The Heights) – Chapter 7: Verse 199

“Hold to forgiveness; command what is right, and turn away from the ignorant.”

In this verse love and forgiveness are shown to be infinitely better than justice through vengeance. Even while the Quran allows for the “law of equality” (i.e., the grim and literal justice of exacting an eye for an eye), with the reminder that this primitive form of justice restrains people from perpetrating violence against each other so acts as a positive force in human affairs, it emphasizes that God has opened another, better path for dealing with situations of injury and loss, and this is the path of remission, compensation, and reconciliation. Stating undeniable preference for this second way, the Quran explains that God offers it as a concession and token of Divine mercy.

It is crucial to understand that the Quran gives a choice to the one who has suffered injury and/or loss: to seek justice or to seek reconciliation and transformation. In other words, the injured party is empowered to choose, with a strong word of encouragement to think seriously about God’s preferred option. Forgiveness and reconciliation are thus not mandated or forced upon the injured; rather, both paths are left open. When a person’s power has been taken from her or him through violence, she or he must regain a sense of wholeness and personal empowerment before the option of forgiveness has any meaning. In the case of Joseph, he forgave from a place of power and healing, and we see an almost identical dynamic in the life of the prophet Muhammad.

Compiled From:
In the Light of a Blessed Tree” – Timothy J. Gianotti, pp. 108, 109

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Posted by on October 21, 2016 in Relax, The message


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Extremist Hollande :France has ‘problem with Islam’

France has a “problem with Islam” and there is “too much” unwanted immigration, François Hollande has acknowledged in an explosive new book in which the Socialist president controversially claims that “the veiled woman of today” will tomorrow become France’s national icon, Marianne.

Over the course of 61 sit-down interviews and Elysée dinners with two investigative journalists, the French leader issues a string of extraordinarily unguarded comments on everything from Islam, football, “cowardly” judges, Nicolas Sarkozy “the little De Gaulle” and his tangled relationships with women.

Perhaps the most controversial passages are on immigration and Islam, in which Mr Hollande tells authors Gérard David and Fabrice Lhomme: “I there think there are too many arrivals, of immigration that shouldn’t be there.”

In another blunt comment, Mr Hollande says: “The fact that there is a problem [in France] with Islam is true. Nobody doubts that.”

“It’s not Islam itself that poses a problem for being a religion that dangerous for the Republic but because it wants to assert itself as a religion inside the French Republic,” he tells the authors.

Asked about the French Right’s obsession with national identity and the Muslim veil, Mr Hollande controversially responds: “The veiled woman of today will become France’s Marianne [national icon] of tomorrow.”

The ambiguous comments were interpreted by some on the Right as Hollande suggesting that the national symbol may become a woman in a burka, but Mr Hollande said that he meant he wanted to see Muslim women “free” from the veil.

“If we manage to provide the right conditions for her to flourish she will free herself from her veil and become French, while still remaining a believer if she wants to be, capable of carrying forth an ideal,” he says.

“Ultimately, what bet are we making? It is that this woman will prefer freedom to slavery, that the veil can be a form of protection for her but that tomorrow she won’t need it to feel reassurance about her presence in society.”

The comment sparked an angry reaction from Laurent Wauquiez, interim president of the opposition centre-Right Republicans party, who accused Mr Hollande of being “willing to barter this symbol of the French Republic for political Islam.”

“This is taking as a given the idea of selling off on the cheap the most powerful symbols of the French Republic,” he said.

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Posted by on October 14, 2016 in News


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Amazing nasheed: Ya Rasullallah wa Kudwatana يا رسول الله و قدوتنا


يا رسول الله وقدوتنا
لن ندع الغرب يدنسنا
لن نرضى أبداً ذلتنا
.. يارسول الله ..
سنحطم قيد مآسينا
وندك حصون أعادينا
ونزمجر وسط أعادينا
.. يا رسول الله ..
رجلٌ قد جمع الإحسانا
بالحكمة والصدق إزدانا
وبه ظَهر الحق وبَانا
.. برسول الله ..
لا ندري كيف تجرأتم
وتماديتم بعداوتِنا
لا نــدري كيف تطـــرقتم
.. لرسول الله ..
شُلت أيدٍ بتماديها
قد حَفرت قبراً يحويها
فيما قد رَســمت هـَـادينا
.. ورسول الله ..
وقلوبٌ أبداً لا تنسى
من أصلحها فغَدت ترسا
سهما رُمحا سيفا قوسا
.. لرسول الله ..
يا غَربُ إعتبروا بماضينا
كم دُسنا رؤوس أعادينا
وسنمضي اليوم كماضينا
..لرسول الله ..
يا غربُ سيسطعكم نورٌ
قد أشرق فوق روابينا
لن يبقى الإسلام سجينا
..يا رسول الله..
نشيد: يا رسول الله وقدوتنا.
*صل الله عليه و علي آله وصحابته وسلم أجمعين*


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Posted by on August 30, 2016 in Relax, Video


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The Islamic History of Portugal

Portugal was once an Islamic kingdom.
It may come as a surprise to many that much of Portugal once lived under Islamic rule for over 500 years from the early 8th century during the period when Muslims ruled Andalusia. At that time Portugal was called Al-Garb Al-Andalus (the west of Al-Andalus, Spain).

The city of Silves was the capital of the medieval Muslim Kingdom of Portugal.

The Muslim introduction of new agricultural technology and plain hard work made Portugal prosper. To this day, the common Portuguese verb “mourejar” means “to work like a Moor (Muslim),” and it implies unusual diligence and tenacity. Indeed, Portuguese is saturated with thousands of words with Arabic origin.

Antonio Preto da Silva, a former Portuguese tourism commissioner in Canada stated:

“A good number of our people, especially educated people, know quite well that the Arabs were part of our history… They contributed to our language, our architecture and especially to our knowledge of navigation. The lateen sail and the astrolabe, introduced by the Arabs, were instrumental in launching our nation into its Age of Discovery.”

Portuguese Christian Reconquista (crusade) gradually forced the Muslims south, driving them from their last strongholds along the Algarve coast in 1249.

The Islamic period in Portugal left few major monuments. Portugal was always on the outer edge of the Muslim world and its frontier rulers invested little in grandiose construction. Today, the town of Mértola, in the Alentejo, possesses the only partial remains of a mosque, converted to a Catholic Church after the Reconquista. The waterwheel in Algarve today is a descendant of the Muslim waterwheel that helped revolutionise agriculture in Portugal as in Spain.
The Portuguese language is however peppered with words of Arabic origin, often those relating to food, farming and manual work. One commonly used is “oxalá” – a direct descendent of “inshaAllah”, the term meaning “God willing.” The city we know of as Lisbon, originates from the city once known as Al-Ishbun. The famous city of Algarve, takes its name directly from al-Gharb al-Andalus. These are not the only places to inherit a Muslim name, hundreds of place names in Portugal start with “Al”, the Arabic for ‘The’. The Alfama district in Lisbon is one such example. In fact, all across the Mediterranean this is the case, from Alghero in Sardinia to Algeciras in Southern Spain. The Portuguese language continues to borrow many words from Arabic, such as azeitona (olives) and garrafa (bottle). Others include azenha (water mill), from the Arabic al-saniyah and nora (water wheel), from the Arabic na’urah.[1]

Following the period of Muslim rule, now ruled by Christians, Portugal pursued an aggressive stance towards Muslims which would see them come into confrontation with the Mughal Empire in India, the Mamluks in Egypt and eventually the Ottomans. Post-Islamic Portugal would also unfortunately go on to play a leading role in the Atlantic Slave Trade, which involved the mass trade and transportation of slaves from Africa (many of whom were Muslims) and other parts of the world to the American continent.

The Euro 2016 tournament should serve as a reminder to us that Islam is not a new phenomenon in Europe but rather it is part of the fabric of the continent with deep historical roots. former Muslim nations such as Spain, Portugal, and parts of Romania, Hungry and Croatia participated in the tournament , whilst other nations were heavily represented by Muslim players such as France, Switzerland and Germany.

Islam is Europe’s second religion.


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Posted by on July 12, 2016 in Uncategorized


Is the Qur’an A Good Book? – Dr. Joseph Lumbard

Originally posted on:

‘A common question that is both basic yet extremely profound – posed by many critics of the Islamic tradition is whether or not the Qur’an is a good book. Does it promote concepts that provide answers for humans to live a healthy and beneficial lives – for both themselves and the world around them?
Take a look at how Bayan Claremont’s visiting faculty member, Dr. Joseph Lumbard tackles this question.’

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Posted by on June 4, 2016 in Relax, Video


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Why Christian minister with the US Marines embraced Islam

Blogging Theology

Find out why a Methodist Christian Minister with the US Marines was so intrigued with Islam that he went to the Masjid to take his Shahada but couldn’t find anyone to help him take it until he decided to track down Nouman Ali Khan.

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Posted by on June 4, 2016 in Relax, Video


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Extremist Slovakian Prime Minister: ‘Islam Has No Place In Slovakia’

In his first interview since being re-elected prime minister of Slovakia, Robert Fico claimed that Islam “has no place in” in the country.

With his usual bigotry; “It may look strange but sorry,” he said in a Thursday wire statement. “Islam has no place in Slovakia.”

The Islamic Foundation in Slovakia argued Fico’s comments “not only harm Slovak Muslims but also the country’s interests as a sovereign country which is building its position on the international scene.”

“We ask with what have we deserved to become the target of hatred not just on the internet and in public space, but also from those who should protect us based on their essential role and function,” they told the Spectator.

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Posted by on May 27, 2016 in News


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