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Monthly Archives: October 2018

Irish Singer ‘Sinead O’Connor’ Converts to Islam

Irish Singer ‘Sinead O’Connor’ Converts to Islam

The Irish singer-songwriter Sinéad O’Connor, also known as Magda Davitt, revealed on Twitter last week that she has ditched Catholicism for Islam and changed her name to Shuhada’ Davitt, Irish Central reported on October 24.

“This is to announce that I am proud to have become a Muslim. This is the natural conclusion of any intelligent theologian’s journey. All scripture study leads to Islam. Which makes all other scriptures redundant. I’ll be given (another) new name. It will be Shuhada’,” she tweeted.

O’Connor posted a video of herself singing the Azan, the Muslim call to prayer.

The video was captioned with: “Here is my 1st attempt at singing the Azan. I got some pronunciation (sic) wrong because emotions took me from my page… but there’ll be hundreds of others onstage to come …,” she wrote.

“When I’ve practiced it 30 times I’m gonna make the world stop turning.”

The 51-year-old Irish artist was an ordained priest in a breakaway Catholic sect, and last year she underwent intensive mental health treatment in the US.

Another tweet from O’Connor said: “My best friend, Elaine just gave me my 1st Hijab and she got chills all over her body when I put it on. Not gonna post a photo because is intensely personal. And I’m an ugly old hag. But I’m a very, very, very happy old hag,” she proclaimed.

The singer who made hits in the 1990s is back in Dublin to collaborate with Ronnie Wood of the Rolling Stones, Irish actor Cillian Murphy, Pink Floyd’s Nick Mason and singer Imelda May for a new EP, One More Yard, which pays tribute to a young Irish World War I soldier, Michael Thomas Wall, and uses words from the 90 letters he wrote home during the war.

O’Connor sings lead vocals, and proceeds from the project will go to charities raising awareness about cancer. In addition to her ten solo albums, her work includes many singles, songs for films, collaborations with many other artists, and appearances at charity fundraising concerts.

Conversion to Islam

The news of O’Connor’s conversion was welcomed by renowned Muslim scholar Yasir Qadhi.

According to 2015’s international estimates, there were 1.8 billion Muslims in the world, with one out of four humans being Muslim, making Islam the 2nd largest religion in the world.

According to a 2016 study by Pew Research Center, “0.3% of the global Muslim population growth in the period of 2010–2015 was due to conversions, while 99.7% of the global Muslim population growth was due natural increase.

In non-Muslim countries like the US, the New York Times estimated that 25% of American Muslims are converts. In Britain, around 6,000 people convert to Islam per year.

According to Pew Research, 77% of new Muslim converts come from Christianity, whereas 19% were from atheism. On the other hand, 55% of Muslims who left Islam went to atheism, and 22% converted to Christianity.

 
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Posted by on October 25, 2018 in News

 

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European Court of Human Rights: Insulting Prophet Muhammad not ‘free speech’

European Court of Human Rights: Insulting Prophet Muhammad not ‘free speech’

Defaming the Prophet Muhammed “goes beyond the permissible limits of an objective debate” and “could stir up prejudice and put at risk religious peace” and thus exceeds the permissible limits of freedom of expression, ruled the European Court of Human Rights (ECHR) on Thursday, upholding a lower court decision.

The European Court of Human Rights ruled Thursday that an Austrian woman’s criminal conviction and fine for her statements accusing the Prophet Muhammad of pedophilia did not breach her right to free speech.

The woman, named only as ES by the court, had held seminars on Islam in 2008 and 2009 for the far-right Freedom Party (FPO) where she discussed the prophet’s marriage to his wife Aisha, a child at the time, and implied that he was a pedophile.

An Austrian court convicted her of disparaging religious doctrines in 2011 and fined her 480 euros (548 dollars), a judgment that was upheld on two appeals.

Stating that the court had found that “the applicant’s statements had been likely to arouse justified indignation in Muslims” and “amounted to a generalization without factual basis”, the ECtHR said that the woman’s comments could not be covered by the freedom of expression.

ES’ statements “were not phrased in a neutral manner aimed at being an objective contribution to a public debate concerning child marriages,” the ECHR held, adding that the moderate fine imposed on her could not be considered disproportionate.

The Austrian courts had drawn a distinction between pedophilia and child marriage, which was also a common practice historically in European ruling families.

The ECtHR also underlined that it classified the ‘impugned’ statements as “an abusive attack on the Prophet of Islam, which was capable of stirring up prejudice and putting at risk religious peace.”

It noted that the Austrian courts had held that ES was making value judgments partly based on untrue facts and without regard to the historical context.

 
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Posted by on October 25, 2018 in News

 

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France’s hijab ban violates human rights, UN committee

France’s hijab ban violates human rights, UN committee

Following complaints by two French Muslim women, fined for wearing a full-body veil or niqab, a UN Committee of independent human rights experts ruled in their favour on Tuesday, stating that their freedom to practice their religion had been infringed.

The Committee, mandated with monitoring the implementation of the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights, received the two complaints in 2016.

The women had been prosecuted, convicted and fined in 2012 for wearing the niqab, based on a 2010 French law which stipulates that “no one may, in a public space, wear any article of clothing intended to conceal the face.” The law has the effect of banning the wearing of the full Islamic veil in public, which covers the whole body, leaving only a narrow slit for the eyes.

The Committee of 18 independent experts from around the world, stated in two rulings, that the right to practice one’s religion includes the wearing of distinctive clothing and head coverings.

“The State has not demonstrated how the full veil presents a threat in itself for public security to justify this absolute ban,” the decision read, adding that the French Government had not adequately explained why hiding one’s face is forbidden for religious reasons, while it is authorized in other contexts such as sports, or artistic settings.

The experts also concluded that the ban, rather than protecting fully veiled women, could have the effect of confining them to their homes, impeding their access to public services and marginalizing them.

The Committee acknowledged that Governments’ law enforcement entities must be able “in some circumstances” to demand that individuals show their faces, meaning they would have to uncover them in specific and “concrete situations”, where public security was at stake, or for formal identification purposes.

Committee members noted, however, that the scope of the French law was not limited to such specific contexts and that it prevents people from hiding their faces in public spaces “at all times”.

“The decisions are not directed against the notion of secularity, nor are they an endorsement of a custom which many on the Committee, including myself, regard as a form of oppression of women,” said Yuval Shany, Chair of the Committee.

He explained that the decisions reflected the position that a general criminal ban did not allow for a reasonable balance between public interests and individual rights.

Anyone can bring an alleged violation of human rights to the attention of the United Nations committees tasked with monitoring the realization of various international human rights treaties, and thousands of people around the world do so every year. Once a case has been deemed admissible and a decision has been made, there is no possibility to appeal against the committees’ decisions, as they are final.

If a committee concludes that a violation of a treaty has taken place, the decisions – which are not legally-binding – offer recommendations for the State involved in the case, which then has 180 days to provide information on the steps it has taken to implement those recommendations.

In these two specific cases, recommendations include a compensation of the two petitioners, and measures to prevent similar violations in the future, including a review of the 2010 law.

The Human Rights Committee monitors States parties’ adherence to the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights, which to date has been ratified by 172 States parties. The Committee is made up of 18 members who are independent human rights experts drawn from around the world, who serve in their personal capacity and not as representatives of States parties.

 
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Posted by on October 24, 2018 in News, Sex !

 

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